Questions about example sentences with, and the definition and usage of "Is"

The meaning of "Is" in various phrases and sentences

Q: What does Is it hot in here or is it just you? mean?
A: If it's phrased that way then yes it would be word play on being sexy

It's also said "Is it hot in here or is it just me" which can be said when trying to lighten an uncomfortable or awkward situation
Q: What does Is there any way I can get a plus three? mean?
A: Plus one means you are bringing one person with you but plus three the man wants to bring 3 people
Q: What does Is anybody out there? mean?
A: "Is anyone out there?"

Anyone and anybody mean the same thing and can be use interchangeably. As "any one" or "any body" would make sense.

However "anyone" is a little more formally used.
Q: What does "Is that so?" mean?
A: It's synonymous with "Really?", "For real?" or "Is that really true?"

It indicates you are surprised by a fact/statement or you find it hard to believe. Example:
A: "This painting is worth over $1 Million dollars
B: "Is that so? Wow!"

The expression can be used both sincerely and sarcastically.

When used sarcastically it implies that you are surprised the person is even claiming the fact to be true because it is literally unbelievable or you clearly do not think it's true.

Example:
A: "I can jump over a car"
B: "Is that so? Well... I'll have to see that before I believe it"
Q: What does What of it? (Is there any particular crime in your buck teeth?) mean?
A: "What of it?" means "who cares?", "it's nothing", "what does it matter?", "it's no big deal".

Example sentences using "Is"

Q: Please show me example sentences with Is it okay.
A: Is it okay to sit beside you?
Is it okay if I call you later?
Is it okay eating while working?
Q: Please show me example sentences with Is there anything like "was use/used to"? How can we make past the "get used to"? .
A: to get used to - got used to

He didn't like the city before, but he got used to it.

to be used to - was used to

She treated him badly, but he was used to it.
Q: Please show me example sentences with Is there any situation I can use these chunks of words " "do volleyball"/ "do french / "do judo" / "do ballet"?.
A: I think it's more common to say "play volleyball" "practice/speak French" "practice Judo" or "practice ballet" than "do" for any of these.
Q: Please show me example sentences with Is there ~.
A: Is there a doctor in the house?
Is there a reason why you are so crabby?
Is there any milk left?
Q: Please show me example sentences with cherry-pick. Is it means"choose something carefully"?.
A: @Mariamisme: Not really.

It's rare to hear someone use the term 'cherry-pick' because most people would just use 'pick' or something else.

Synonyms of "Is" and their differences

Q: What is the difference between Is there something to eat? and Is there anything to eat? ?
A: No difference, you can use both.
Q: What is the difference between Is there any way I can help? and Can I help you with something? ?
A: They could be used interchangeably, but one may fit better than the other in specific situations.

If someone looks lost (holding a map, turning it around etc), a passerby could say"can I help you with something?" But "is there any way I can help?" would work as well.

If a friend is in a very difficult situation, you would ask "is there any way I can help?" implying that you are ready to offer a lot to help. "Can I help you with something?" works also, but the first one suggests more dedication.
Q: What is the difference between Is it gonna be raining tomorrow? and Is it gonna rain tomorrow? ?
A: Almost the exact same thing! Except the first one sounds like "all day", and the second sounds like a shower.
Q: What is the difference between Is Harry bringing anyone to the wedding? and Will Harry bring anyone to the wedding? ?
A: They are the same, just different ways of wording it :)
Q: What is the difference between Is this your pen? and This is your pen? ?
A: "Is this your pen?" is something I would ask people if I found a pen on the floor at work or school.

If I had found the pen and kept it for my own use, someone would eventually come up to me and say "Hey, that's mine!", to which I would respond "Oh, this is /your/ pen??"

To me, "Is this your pen?" is a seemingly harmless question, while "This is your pen?" is something I would say if I unknowingly took someone else's pen and they confronted me for doing so.

Hope this helped!

Translations of "Is"

Q: How do you say this in English (US)? Is it natural to say “I dread the prospect of spending a night all alone in the empty house.” ?
A: Yes! It sounds natural.
Q: How do you say this in English (US)? Is "downvote" used as an expression or metaphor of disagreement or different opinions on the internet?
A: Yes. Down vote means you don't agree or you don't like something.

Geez, my reddit comment is getting heavily downvoted. Oh well.
Q: How do you say this in English (UK)? Is this correct? :

I accidentally scratched myself on the bushes when I ran to stop my boat being swept away by the current.
A: The 'subject' is running to stop the boat, and the action is getting scratched. It's better to do this...

-When I ran to stop my boat from being swept away by the current, I accidentally scratched myself on the bushes.

Why write it this way? Well let's look at your sentence again, but I will cut off the end.

-I accidentally scratched myself on the bushes when I ran to stop

The reader needs to remember all of this, before the sentence will make sense. At this point we have no idea why you scratched yourself. Where are the bushes? Why were you near bushes? Why were you running? What was so important? But if we switch it....

-When I ran to stop my boat from being swept away by the current

You've told us something. You ran to stop your boat from being swept away by the current. (you need to add the word "from" in there.) Now if we add...

-I accidentally scratched myself on the bushes

This immediately makes sense... right? We already understand why this would happen, since you mentioned it in the first part of the sentence. The reader is never left wondering. So we end up with this...

When I ran to stop my boat from being swept away by the current, I accidentally scratched myself on the bushes.

Q: How do you say this in English (US)? 1. Is this correct? 2. I want to use “The city of Seoul” as a subject and “require” as a verb. How can I make correct sentence😀? Foreign workers in Korea were required to get COVID-19 test, according to the execution order by the city of Seoul.
A: The City of Seoul required foreign workers in Korea to get a COVID-19 test as per their execution order.

Just to clarify, did Seoul order everyone in Korea to get a test or just those residing in Seoul? If that's the case, replace 'Korea' with 'Seoul'.
Q: How do you say this in English (US)? Is this sentence correct?

This river is too deep to swim there.
A: Sounds good!

Other questions about "Is"

Q: Is this sentence right?
"As you may know, I am going to go to Georgia in the states this summer."
A: That is correct :)
Q: Is this expression correct?
"I’m gonna be telling you about two problems with the summer abroad program."
A:
Hmmm I see.
If you are talking with someone and you want to explain those problems it is better to start like this:
“The two main problems about the summer abroad program are that (your explanation)”

-“main” means principal
-“are that” is a good way to continue the conversation with the explanation.
Saying “I’m gonna be telling you” feels like you’re going to talk about it later like in a few days.

Hope this helped :)
Q: Is it impolite to say " Have it your way "?
A: Not sure it is impolite, but it is usually used after a disagreement or argument…
You give up, and say “have it your way”.
You are not happy about it , but don’t want to waste anymore time discussing/arguing about it
Q: Is "the" necessary in the following sentence?

The book's author uses several interesting stories to promote moral values in ***the*** society.
A: Assuming the author is referring to the society she is in or society as a whole, such as all people, no it is not necessary, of course, if the author was referring to another society, then yes.
Such as an author who lives in the US. but is writing about morals in India, then it would be "the society."
Q: Is "with" used correctly? The beds can be really hard and you may wake up with a backache every morning. WITH dining you may experience other problems, ranging from poor service to food poisoning.

With dining you may experience poor service and food poisoning.
A: Use WHEN dining you may…
WHILE dining you may…

WITH dining might be correctly used, but would sound strange and unnatural.

Meanings and usages of similar words and phrases

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