Questions about example sentences with, and the definition and usage of "Is"

The meaning of "Is" in various phrases and sentences

Q: What does Is it hot in here or is it just you? mean?
A: If it's phrased that way then yes it would be word play on being sexy

It's also said "Is it hot in here or is it just me" which can be said when trying to lighten an uncomfortable or awkward situation
Q: What does Is there any way I can get a plus three? mean?
A: Plus one means you are bringing one person with you but plus three the man wants to bring 3 people
Q: What does Is anybody out there? mean?
A: "Is anyone out there?"

Anyone and anybody mean the same thing and can be use interchangeably. As "any one" or "any body" would make sense.

However "anyone" is a little more formally used.
Q: What does "Is that so?" mean?
A: It's synonymous with "Really?", "For real?" or "Is that really true?"

It indicates you are surprised by a fact/statement or you find it hard to believe. Example:
A: "This painting is worth over $1 Million dollars
B: "Is that so? Wow!"

The expression can be used both sincerely and sarcastically.

When used sarcastically it implies that you are surprised the person is even claiming the fact to be true because it is literally unbelievable or you clearly do not think it's true.

Example:
A: "I can jump over a car"
B: "Is that so? Well... I'll have to see that before I believe it"
Q: What does What of it? (Is there any particular crime in your buck teeth?) mean?
A: "What of it?" means "who cares?", "it's nothing", "what does it matter?", "it's no big deal".

Example sentences using "Is"

Q: Please show me example sentences with Is it okay.
A: Is it okay to sit beside you?
Is it okay if I call you later?
Is it okay eating while working?
Q: Please show me example sentences with Is there anything like "was use/used to"? How can we make past the "get used to"? .
A: to get used to - got used to

He didn't like the city before, but he got used to it.

to be used to - was used to

She treated him badly, but he was used to it.
Q: Please show me example sentences with Is there any situation I can use these chunks of words " "do volleyball"/ "do french / "do judo" / "do ballet"?.
A: I think it's more common to say "play volleyball" "practice/speak French" "practice Judo" or "practice ballet" than "do" for any of these.
Q: Please show me example sentences with Is there ~.
A: Is there a doctor in the house?
Is there a reason why you are so crabby?
Is there any milk left?
Q: Please show me example sentences with cherry-pick. Is it means"choose something carefully"?.
A: @Mariamisme: Not really.

It's rare to hear someone use the term 'cherry-pick' because most people would just use 'pick' or something else.

Synonyms of "Is" and their differences

Q: What is the difference between Is there something to eat? and Is there anything to eat? ?
A: No difference, you can use both.
Q: What is the difference between Is there any way I can help? and Can I help you with something? ?
A: They could be used interchangeably, but one may fit better than the other in specific situations.

If someone looks lost (holding a map, turning it around etc), a passerby could say"can I help you with something?" But "is there any way I can help?" would work as well.

If a friend is in a very difficult situation, you would ask "is there any way I can help?" implying that you are ready to offer a lot to help. "Can I help you with something?" works also, but the first one suggests more dedication.
Q: What is the difference between Is it gonna be raining tomorrow? and Is it gonna rain tomorrow? ?
A: Almost the exact same thing! Except the first one sounds like "all day", and the second sounds like a shower.
Q: What is the difference between Is Harry bringing anyone to the wedding? and Will Harry bring anyone to the wedding? ?
A: They are the same, just different ways of wording it :)
Q: What is the difference between Is this your pen? and This is your pen? ?
A: "Is this your pen?" is something I would ask people if I found a pen on the floor at work or school.

If I had found the pen and kept it for my own use, someone would eventually come up to me and say "Hey, that's mine!", to which I would respond "Oh, this is /your/ pen??"

To me, "Is this your pen?" is a seemingly harmless question, while "This is your pen?" is something I would say if I unknowingly took someone else's pen and they confronted me for doing so.

Hope this helped!

Translations of "Is"

Q: How do you say this in English (US)? Is it ok to call my daugthers “my dovey lovies”? Or is it used only by couples?
A: It would be "lovey dovey" and it sounds weird, a) usually only with couples and b) usually only people 70+ or older would say that.
Q: How do you say this in English (US)? Is it natural??

I think the reason why starbucks in korea is so expensive is to maintain high quality of restroom for free to everyone.
A: instead of that you can say "I think the reason why Starbucks is so expensive in korea is because of the high maintenance of the free restrooms"
Q: How do you say this in English (US)? If she's not motivated, then I'm not going to be motivated.
Is this correct?
A: 100 percent correct
Q: How do you say this in English (US)? Is it natural??

20 years ago?? I must be a child for that year
A: No, maybe you mean: “20 years ago?? I was a child back then.”
Q: How do you say this in English (US)? Is it natural??

"I think Korea's scenery is just too normal.
It's not worth to visit for watching scenery."
A: @Goritabune@Goritabune
I think Korea's scenery is just too bland. It's not worth visiting for the scenery.
( this is one option).

Other questions about "Is"

Q: Is this sentence natural?

I have to send out my diving equipment to the factory for overhauling, but there isn't any cardboard for packing. So I'll get it from a supermarket for free and am going to send out my equipment today.
A: I would say:

I have to send my diving equipment to the factory for overhaul, but there isn't any cardboard for packing. So, I'll get it from a supermarket for free and send out my equipment today.
Q: Is there anyone know how to change this sentence to you-viewpoint?

“We cannot provide any fringe benefits until after you have been with our company for three months.”
A: You have to be with our company for three months before we can provide any fringe benefits
Q: Is this correct?
He is the first man to have broken the 100-point barrier in the men’s short program.
= He is the first man that has broken the…
= He is the first man having broken the…

Context: this is a report which talks about an athlete.
A: “He is the first man that has broken the”, would mean the same. We would probably say “first man to break”, though. “First man that has broken” and “first man to have broken” both sound a little formal, like an announcer during a sports broadcast. They are all understandable and mean the same thing, though.

“He is the first man breaking” sounds unnatural to me. The only way I can think to phrase it that way is “He has scored over 100 points, breaking the 100 point barrier for the first time” but we tend to avoid unnecessary duplication so maybe “he has set a new record in the men’s short program, breaking the 100 point barrier for the first time”.
Q: Is this correct?

I got three mails.
A: Yes. "I got three pieces of mail."
Q: Is it written correct?

Have we got any apple?
A: *Is this written correctly?

Have we got any apples? Or Have we got an apple?

Meanings and usages of similar words and phrases

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