Questions about example sentences with, and the definition and usage of "Cambridge"

The meaning of "Cambridge" in various phrases and sentences

Q: What does i looked it up on the Cambridge Dictionary website.
"She condemned her relentless vilification by the press."
she vilifies the press or the press vilifies her? mean?
A: The clues here are "she condemned" and "by the press"
She wouldn't condemn her own actions and "by" tells us the press is doing it to her.
Q: What does then-student of Cambridge University mean?
A: It means that this person used to be a student of Cambridge. For example:

Michelle, a then-student of Cambridge, studied art and archeology.

I think it’s more natural to say “then a student” but both work.
Q: What does Cambridge Bound mean?
A: Going to Cambridge

Synonyms of "Cambridge" and their differences

Q: What is the difference between I'll arrive to Cambridge at 5pm and I'll arrive in Cambridge at 5pm and Please which one is correct ?
A: I'll arrive in Cambridge at 5pm is correct

Translations of "Cambridge"

Q: How do you say this in English (US)? Cambridge
A: Check the question to view the answer
Q: How do you say this in English (US)? Cambridge
A: Check the question to view the answer
Q: How do you say this in English (US)? Cambridge
A: Check the question to view the answer
Q: How do you say this in English (UK)? how to say Cambridge
A: Check the question to view the answer

Other questions about "Cambridge"

Q: Please show me how to pronounce Cambridge, and which ones is correct: I'll arrive To Cambridge at 5 p.m or I'll arrive At Cambridge at 5 p.m.

please and could you tell me why...
A: at, with time
I will arrive at ten o'clock.
The movie started at noon.

with destinations it depends on the verb
arrive at or in
get to (same meaning as arrive, and more common)

Here are some phrases that sound ok

I will arrive in London at noon
I will get to New York at ten o'clock
I will arrive at his house tomorrow.
Q: Cambridge does this sound natural?
A: Check the question to view the answer
Q: I know Cambridge Bound means enter Cambridge.I wonder,is that a fixed expression or is there any further detail explantion?☺
A: It means you are going to Cambridge, or heading towards Cambridge
Q: In my Cambridge English text book, there are sentences like this:
"The first thing I would say about my best friend is that she's very sensible. I've never known Irma to do anything silly."

I don't understand "I've never known Irma to do anything silly."
Does it mean "I've never known that she does anything silly"?
A: Yes, you have the right sense of this phrase. But I think that we say "to do" here because this is a case where we use the infinitive of the verb "to do". I'm sorry but I'm not sure why!

Also, I think there is a sense here that the speaker has observed Irma in the past, and based on those observations, she can quite confidently say that Irma does not do silly things.
Q: I'm studying English using a Cambridge text book about weather.
It says, "sun" is noun and "sunny" is adjective for "sun". And "wind" is noun and "windy" is adjective for "wind".
It also says, "rain" is noun and "wet" is adjective for "rain".
So if you say "it's windy today", it will mean "the wind is blowing today," I suppose.
And then if you say "it's wet today", does it mean "it's raining today"?
A: Wet can mean it is raining but also can mean it was raining and it is wet outside

Meanings and usages of similar words and phrases

Latest words

Cambridge

HiNative is a platform for users to exchange their knowledge about different languages and cultures. We cannot guarantee that every answer is 100% accurate.

Newest Questions
Topic Questions
Recommended Questions