Questions about example sentences with, and the definition and usage of "Carpaccio"

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Q: 🌿"Carpaccio" ~From the Scene 2 in the movie, "No Reservations"


Since the other day, I’ve been learning English with the movie "No Reservations."

When I watched the first scene, two characters were talking together.
One of them, a leading role named "Kate," say, "Of course" as "(f) course," and "It could be" as "(t) could be" reducing the first letter, "O" and "I."
I'm not sure, but she sounded to be speaking like that to me.

To be accurate, they might be "could be" and "course" omitting "It" and "Of." I'm not sure if my ears are right or working properly, but these words sounded like that to me.

After that, I watched the second and third scene. About eight people were talking together in those scenes, and only Kate seemed to be speaking reducing some parts of words like that.

It was Catherine Zeta-Jones that played the leading role "Kate," so maybe that might be her own, unique way of speaking.

She even said, "carpaccio" as "paccio" in the second scene!
I was very surprised when I heard her say "carpaccio" as "paccio."
Is that her own way of saying, or do some people say like that ("paccio") ?

I like her way of saying the lines so much that I recently enjoy saying them copying her. does this sound natural?
A: I know people who that like that and it's not incorrect; they just feel natural enough to use shortened language.

I wouldn't recommend it for someone who's learning English though but it depends on how confident you feel
Q: 🌿"Carpaccio" ~From the Scene 2


When I watched the first scene of the movie, "No Reservations," two characters were talking together. One of them, a leading role named "Kate," say, "Of course" as "f course," and "It could be" as "t could be" reducing the first letter, "O" and "I."
I'm not sure, but she sounded to be speaking like that to me.

To be accurate, they might be "could be" and "course" omitting "It" and "Of." I'm not sure if my ears are right or working properly, but these words sounded like that to me.

After that, I watched the second and third scene. About eight people appeared and were talking together in those scenes, and only Kate seemed to be speaking like that.

It was Catherine Zeta-Jones that played the leading role "Kate," so maybe that might be her own, unique way of speaking.

She even said, "carpaccio" as "paccio" in the second scene!
I was very surprised when I heard her say "carpaccio" as "paccio," ,
Is that her own way of saying, or do some people say like that ("paccio") ?

I like her way of saying the lines so much that I recently enjoy saying the lines copying her. does this sound natural?
A: Your English is very good and clear! She is speaking in slang (スラング) so it is correct in speaking but not in writing

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Carpaccio

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