Questions about example sentences with, and the definition and usage of "Japan"

The meaning of "Japan" in various phrases and sentences

Q: What does Japan may have to urgently jettison it's pacifist modus operandi in the face of palpable threat to its very survival. mean?
A: Japan will have to be more militarily aggressive, because it is being threatened by the outside. Previously it didn't "strike first" because it didn't need to.
Q: What does I get to Japan mean?
A: It means like a method or to go but in a differebt retrospect

Like

How can I get to Japan? (Asking method).

I got to Japan safely.
Q: What does If I were to go to Japan mean?
A: it means that if the person ever has a possibility to go to Japan
Example: "If i were ever to go to Japan the first thing I'd do is go to a nature reserve "
In the example, if the person ever has the chance, possibility, or happens to visit Japan (if i were to go to Japan) they'd visit a nature reserve.
Q: What does I want to also work in Japan, off and on, but live in america. It is such a hard situation. I bet you could swing it. mean?
A: @Ri-na It means:

I want to also work in Japan = I want to work in Japan too

off and on = from time to time

but live in america.

It is such a hard situation.

I bet you could swing it. = "swing it" is a verb phrase that means "be successful", "make it work".

So they both have the same ambition and this person is encouraging the other.

わかりましたか?
Q: What does and, more acutely to Japan mean?
A: さん
This sentence comes from an article in Al Jazeera about Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe's recent visit to Tokyo. This is a poorly constructed sentence -- even a native English speaker will be confused by it. I think he means that Harare's isolation from the west, and especially from the United States, is a difficult issue for Japan.

Harare is the capital of Zimbabwe, and is used figuratively here to mean Zimbabwe's government.

Example sentences using "Japan"

Q: Please show me example sentences with Japan.
A: "A lot of people here in the west love Japan, because of Anime and the culture in general. When I was younger, age 13 I wanted to move to Japan, however, I later found out that to learn Japanese, I would need to not only know Hiragana and Katakana, but I would also need to learn a lot of Kanjis. This information made me not want to learn Japanese anymore." (A true story by the way... 😅)

"I would love to visit Japan one day. Particularly Osaka and Tokyo. I love the Osakan Dialect. It sounds friendly to me non-japanese ears." (Also a true story...)

"Are you from Tokyo, Japan? If not, which part of Japan are you from?"
Q: Please show me example sentences with Japan .
A: I like your sentences! Thank you very much!
Q: Please show me example sentences with What do you say thank you in Japan .
A: arigatou
Q: Please show me example sentences with Can you not (like 'Can you not go back to Japan').
A: "Can you not make any noise?"
"Can you not disturb me?"
"Can you not go after me?"
"Can you not step on my shoes?"
Q: Please show me example sentences with Unlike in Japan, where....
A: Unlike in Japan, where chopsticks are the primary tool for eating, the United States almost exclusively uses forks and knives.

In the United States, cars drive on the right side of the road, unlike in Japan where they drive on the left.

Synonyms of "Japan" and their differences

Q: What is the difference between I have lived in Japan for 10 years. and I have been living in Japan for 10 years. and I'm studying present perfect continuous. I don't understand the differences between them. Are they the same meaning. Please teach me. Thank you. ?
A: @sachichiyan: they mean the same thing, the only difference is that the first sentence is more straightforward and the second sentence just provides more information on what you are talking about
Q: What is the difference between You go back to Japan again and You get to go back to Japan again ?
A: Ah, ごめんなさい
I'm not good enough at Japanese to explain, so I will try easier English :)

"I get to go" = You are happy to go / you were allowed to go
Q: What is the difference between How long have you stayed in Japan? and How long have you been staying in Japan? ?
A: They practically have the same meaning.
Q: What is the difference between I lived in Japan for 10 years. and I have lived in Japan for 10 years. ?
A: "I have lived in Japan for 10 years" implies "I am still living in Japan." "I lived in Japan for 10 years" implies "I am no longer living in Japan"
Q: What is the difference between across Japan and throughout of all Japan / throughout Japan ?
A: ないです。

でも、

throughout of all Japan -> throughout all of Japan

Translations of "Japan"

Q: How do you say this in English (UK)? hi.im mariko.today I talk about my hometown.im from Japan Nagasaki.this is south country side of japan.
A: Hi, my name is Mariko. Today I will be talking about my hometown, Nagasaki, which is located in the south of Japan.
Q: How do you say this in English (US)? I'm from Japan in Hokkaido.は正しいですか?
A: I come from Hokkaido, Japan
Q: How do you say this in English (US)? もう日本に帰ってますか?are you already in Japan? or have you already come back to Japan?
A: "Are you already back in Japan?" and, "Have you already come back to Japan?" are the same. Just add "back" to your first sentence to make sure it means the person was in Japan originally.
Q: How do you say this in English (US)? In Japan, we say "high tention" for the feeling that we are so excite.
A: Hmm... We don't really use the word 'tension' for positive feelings in English. Tension usually means that you are anxious or uncomfortable.

If you are really excited, you can say "I'm so pumped" - for example: "I'm so pumped about that concert tomorrow!"
Or you can simply say "I'm really excited!"
Maybe someone else can suggest some other examples... I'm sure I'm forgetting some good ones.
Q: How do you say this in English (US)? In Japan, we say "high tention" for the feeling that we are so excite.
A: Anxious. Anxious can be a good or bad feeling, but it's very intense. It's a High tension feeling like you might get when you tell someone who you really like that you kinda have a crush on them:) and you're waiting for their response. In this situation you're hopeful, scared, nervous, excited.... Not sure yet if you should feel bad or glad until they respond to you

Other questions about "Japan"

Q: ​‎Do your best , Japan rugby team, for the people damaged by typhoon. does this sound natural?
A: I would say:
Do your best, Japan Rugby team, do it for the people affected by the typhoon.

Almost there!!!!! Nice try!
Q: Japan is about twice the size as my country. does this sound natural?
A: Japan is about twice the size of my country
Or
Japan is about twice as large as my country
Q: In Japan, It's difficult to get a job people from anther county because first of all you need to speak Japanese does this sound natural?
A: In Japan, It's difficult to get a job people from anther county because first of all you need to speak Japanese

this sentance is too long and it doesn’t necessarily make sense you would rather say
In Japan, it’s difficult to get a job when you’re from another country because you need to speak Japanese first.

In that way instead of saying people from another country which is grammatically wrong you say when you’re from another country or you could even say it’s hard for people from another country to get a job that would be better !!
Q: In Japan, It's difficult to get a job people from anther county because first of all you need to speak Japanese does this sound natural?
A: It's difficult for people from another country to get a job in Japan because, first of all, [you/they] need to speak Japanese.
Q: When I heard that Japan was playing well in the 2019 Rugby World Cup, I happened to looked at the team members and found that HALF OF the team, including the coach, were NOT Japanese. What on Earth is this? does this sound natural?
A: When I heard that Japan was playing well in the 2019 Rugby World Cup, I looked at the team members and found that HALF OF the team, including the coach, were NOT Japanese. What on Earth is this?

Your use of capitals as a form of expressing frustrated emphasis is idiomatic. However, the problem I see is "happened to look." It sounds like you saw the team roster because you heard of Japan's involvement, meaning it wasn't just happenstance. Though, it could be interpreted as you finding yourself looking up the roster without really consciously choosing to.

By the way, "happened to looked" is not the right way to say it since happen is already in the past tense.

Meanings and usages of similar words and phrases

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