Questions about example sentences with, and the definition and usage of "Natives"

  • Other questions about "Natives"

    1. Other types of questions
    2. Make sure you get the right ‘a’ sound in “having” (not ‘e’ like “heving”).....

    1. Other types of questions
    2. @vousmevoyeze 2. How many people come? Answer: Many — is correct. You can use ‘many’, ‘a lot (of people)’ and ‘lots (of people)’ to answer that question. There isn’t much difference between those three. However, ‘lots of’ sounds more informal than the other two. How much money do you have? You can’t use ‘pretty much’ in this way. These two words together are used as a kind of synonym to words like ‘basically’, ‘practically’, ‘virtually’ and ‘nearly/almost’. We don’t really use the word ‘much’ on its own as it is uncountable, and therefore should require some clarification. It doesn’t sound natural used on its own either. One of the exceptions is saying ‘very much’ in reply to a question. That being said, using ‘much’ as an adverb is fine, even though it is not as common in some places and can sound a little unnatural nowadays. (For example: I have much time at the weekend.) ‘A lot of’ can be used for countable and uncountable nouns. For example: • I have visited a lot of countries. • I drink a lot of coffee. ‘Lots (of)’ is (or at least SHOULD be) used for countable, as the S at the end of the word suggests plurality. So example answers to that question (How much money do you have?) would be: • I don’t have much money. • I have a lot of money. • A lot.

    1. Other types of questions
    2. Usually means that’s it’s something you typically or habitually do, regardless of whether you like it or not. To go off your examples, someone who usually wakes up at night most likely doesn’t want to and it may or may not cause them to be unrested and tired during the day. To be used to something means that you are accustomed to it to the point where it doesn’t really effect you, similar to how a professional athlete is “used to” working out, so working out isn’t as difficult for them versus someone who’s very out of shape and not “used to it”. To go off your example, someone who is “used to” waking up at night have become accustomed to it so it doesn’t really effect them during the day, or at least they know to expect that it will happen.

    1. Other types of questions
    2. @vousmevoyeze To say that a person gets another person, i.e. “You get me.” means something quite different, it’s more like “You really understand me.” and that’s the same even if you switch around the people, ex: “She gets you.” means “She really knows you well.” As for changing “I get it.” to “He gets it.” or “They’ve got it.” etc., the only thing that changes are the people who have understood. ‘He’ is another person, male. ‘They’ refers to two or more (multiple) other people. In this context, “it” is not an actual physical item but rather the thing that was understood. Do you get it? (Does that make sense to you? Were you able to understand?)

    1. Other types of questions
    2. "Do you keep things only in this site?"

Meanings and usages of similar words and phrases

Latest words

Words similar to Natives

HiNative is a platform for users to exchange their knowledge about different languages and cultures. We cannot guarantee that every answer is 100% accurate.