Questions about example sentences with, and the definition and usage of "Shanghai"

  • The meaning of "Shanghai" in various phrases and sentences

    1. Meanings of words and phrases
    2. It means that because the stocks dropped, the number of people who lost money is 1222, while the number of people who gained money is 68.

    1. Meanings of words and phrases
    2. It’s like saying “hello from Shanghai.” The person is sending you a greeting from Shanghai.

    1. Meanings of words and phrases
    2. Regional office. It is a branch office.

  • Example sentences using "Shanghai"

    1. Example sentences
    2. Sure! What do you need help with?

  • Similar words to "Shanghai" and their differences

    1. Similar words
    2. Both sentences are correct, but "taller" is more commonly used.

    1. Similar words
    2. IF you would use the word absent it would insinuate that your father is absent from his schedule that he has in Shanghai. First sentence is also a little bit unnatural. Second sentence the reader is interpreting that your father has traveled to Shanghai MEANWHILE you are not in Shanghai

    1. Similar words
    2. Am = Committed to go Will = Just planning to go

  • Translations of "Shanghai"

    1. Translations
    2. Half of every month I live in Shanghai while the other half in Tokyo.

    1. Translations
    2. There's no difference they both mean the same thing

    1. Translations
    2. Check the question to view the answer

  • Other questions about "Shanghai"

    1. Other types of questions
    2. "Should my children stay in the mainland to study or go abroad?" Most parents with a stable financial background are able to consider both choices, whereas those without are typically only capable of raising 6000RMB as opposed to the $6000 required to study in the US. I am one of those poor children who has been dreaming of studying abroad, but haplessly born to a family belonging to a lower socioeconomic class, seemingly doomed to stay forever put. "Of course, you poor people would never make it," is what people would freely say to us if it were the 1970s, when our nation was in its early stages of global development (I'm not really sure if this is what you're trying to say, but describing a country as a 'start-up' sounds a bit awkward). However, it is now 2018 and China is far more powerful than it's ever been, so much so that being "poor" is hardly an obstacle to seeing the rest of the world. Below are some of the things that helped to facilitate our road to reaching our dreams of studying overseas. 1. We received support from our government. In stark contrast to China's poor past, it is now powerful and has the capacity to support some of its citizens who want to study abroad. Students who have done well at university may be given a chance to study abroad on exchange, the costs of which would be fully paid by the Chinese government. The government has already supported excellent students with diplomas who plan to continue their tertiary studies. Once they are able to be assessed for a graduate program, he/she can contact his/her tutor who will sort out the entire process. But, what about the students without a diploma, such as those studying in training colleges? Well, the government also provides a program for training school students, which allows them to further their education. If they pass a third-year exam, they are able to participate in the third-year undergraduate program. As long as they continue to study hard and try their best, they will always have more opportunities (this part is a bit unclear, I'm not 100% sure what you're trying to say). 2. Prices are relatively affordable in some countries. Most Chinese people believe that those who study abroad must be wealthy. Yes, money is required to study in the US, UK or other similar English-speaking countries, however, there are non-English-speaking countries whose governments pay the full fees of intuition. In these cases, being rich becomes dispensable. The only other cost is the cost of living in the first month, which can easily and quickly be paid if the student is able to find a part-time job by the second month. Additionally, currently, the average salary in China is ten times what it was in 2000, meaning the cost of living in China has become closer to that of a more developed country, particularly in first-tier cities such as Guangzhou and Shanghai. It has been proven to be easier for students to pay such costs. Furthermore, in France, overseas students who are not wealthy but speak good French are able to apply for public universities, which according to the French government, are intuition-free. There are many more countries similar to France, providing benefits to talented international students, such as partial and full scholarships, which can be obtained merely through hard work demonstrated through merit from previous schools. There are many ways to apply for foreign schools without being rich. Other than the reasons above, there are other approaches to recognizing the dream of studying overseas. In China, there are many private companies that offer students large sums of money, based on certain contracts, to help the cost of studying abroad. Being poor is not a major handicap in today's China, a country that is more powerful than ever and is rapidly becoming the most significant country in the world.

    1. Other types of questions
    2. The tariffs are additional taxes at an usually high rate. So, if a product were to cost $5, a tariff of 3$ may be added. In this context, they are only talking about the total cost of Tariffs, so $50 billion in "taxes" added on, not the products worth.

    1. Other types of questions
    2. It means they performed worse than or fell behind other sectors.

    1. Other types of questions
    2. Look up "layover" in the dictionary. Native speakers would probably use "layover" in your sentence. For example: "I took a sightseeing tour of Shanghai during my layover." Another example: "I had an eight hour layover in Shanghai, so I took a sightseeing tour."

    1. Other types of questions
    2. Perfect 🙂

    1. Other types of questions
    2. In my hometown Wuhan, China, traffic congestion is an everyday phenomenon. I was once stuck in heavy traffic jam on the way to a railway station and had no choice but to change the ticket for the next shift in the end.However, I have developed an interest in traffic congestion since then. Traffic congestion in transport networks means slower speeds, longer trip times, and increased vehicular queueing [1], which is a common consequence of the urbanization, as well as a global issue that all metropolis will face. Some articles show that traffic congestion can cause serious waste of time and energy, and can cause air pollute the air with poisonous gases, which eventually reduces the standard of living. The long traffic jam also might be an obstacle for the ambulances or fire brigades and thus may cause heavy loss of life and property. According to the statistics from the Chinese Academy of Science traffic congestion and management problems the top 15 cities in China lose one billion RMB a day on the average. Further, the super large cities like Beijing the cost reaches six billion RMB per month.[2] Traffic congestion that brought the society huge losses has made increasingly interested in exploring the its causes and solutions how to avoid it. Reasons contributing to the traffic congestion are manifold. Primarily, in lieu with the rapid development of economy the number of private cars has increased dramatically leading to a situation where the main roads and parking facilities designed years ago are somewhat inadequate and need to be improved. Secondly, most public places (like the hospitals, schools and international shopping malls) with high-quality services are concentrated in the city center. This means there is a need to bring in the patients or consumers from the outskirts to the downtown area. Moreover, most of the residential areas are far away from the working place, forming a "tidal phenomenon" in the city. According to a 2018 report published by the ‘JIGUANG Big Data’*, 17.1% of commuters in Beijing commute more than 25 kilometers one way. Also, the insufficient public transportation supply with crowded buses and incomplete metro lines restricts the passengers to use of public transport and eventually makes the traffic jams worse. Focusing on the causes mentioned above, I come up with several corresponding solutions to alleviate the current problems. Firstly, expanding the capacity of the congested roads by not only adding lanes but building overpasses and tunnels as well. Secondly, improving the service standard in the surrounding areas by building satellite cities. For example, Japan solved the congestion problem in Tokyo by dispersing population and industry to its satellite cities, and the process went through five stages from 1958 to the late 1990s. [3] Thirdly, introducing intelligent transportation system (ITS) to smartly manage the traffic through big data collecting, especially on the commuting routes. Finally, developing fast transporting communities guided by fast tunnel traffic [4] to increase the convenience and comfort for residents using public transports to get to work. For instance, from 2006 to 2009, 62% of the new residential area in Shanghai was within 1000 meters to the rail transit [5]. All in all, the traffic congestion challenge has revealed that when formulating a policy more perspectives, the long-term development in particular, should be taken into consideration as well proper adjustment of the policy as the social development takes place. Besides, we could also actively learn from other countries while making appropriate adjustments according to our local needs. Only in this way can we create a suitable policy to satisfy the needs of the maximum number of people.

Meanings and usages of similar words and phrases

Latest words

Words similar to Shanghai

HiNative is a platform for users to exchange their knowledge about different languages and cultures. We cannot guarantee that every answer is 100% accurate.