Questions about example sentences with, and the definition and usage of "Annoy"

  • The meaning of "Annoy" in various phrases and sentences

    1. Meanings of words and phrases
    2. It's basically poking fun at liberals in the political world. Conservatives usually like less restrictions on gun control while for liberals it's the opposite.

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    2. It just means it annoys you a lot, more than you can describe/measure :)

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    2. For the record is a lot like, "just so you know." People use it to add information despite appearances, or despite what they are saying. In the past people used to say "for the record books" so they mean that they want to make sure that people know something about a situation.

  • Example sentences using "Annoy"

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    2. My little brother liked to annoy me every day.

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    2. I hope I don't annoy you if I ask alot of questions. The mosquitos really annoy me. To annoy someone means to bother them. The brother and sister would annoy each other all the time.

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    2. "Stop bothering me!" "He keeps bothering me". "Please stop it, you're being really annoying." "He keeps doing irritating things to annoy me." or "He keeps doing annoying things to irritate me". "Sorry to bother you, but I was wondering if it was okay to ask you some questions?" "The heat and all this sweating is bothering me." Bother can mean: to inconvenience, to interrupt, to suffer from something, and to be annoyed or irritated. Irritated and annoyed are similar, but irritated is a stronger emotion. You can be annoyed if a fly is bothering you by flying around your face, or someone is doing something to purposefully annoy you, etc. Irritate can also refer to physical discomfort. "Causes skin irritation. Do not put directly on skin." "Low irritant insect spray." (the chemical smell doesn't burn your nose), etc. I hope that helps!

  • Similar words to "Annoy" and their differences

    1. Similar words
    2. To disturb and to bother are used both with objects and people. They're both mean to be disruptive or disrupt the current state an object is in. Annoy and irritate are used mostly to describe something that is obnoxious. Don't disturb my studying. Don't bother that dog. Don't irritate me. You annoy me. You can't really say don't annoy my studying but you could say in the other two exemples. Annoy is used more to say don't anger or agitate. Annoy and Irritate The meaning of these two words are pretty similar. However, while both of them can be emotions, only 'irritate' can refer to a physical sensation. Your skin can be 'irritated' by a certain fabric. "It irritates the eyes to look at the sun" Now, to speak about the difference when they apply to emotions seems more difficult. I'd say that 'irritation' might imply a longer period of exposure than 'annoyance' - could be something that has been bothering you for a while. And 'annoy' is more common in the most informal registers. This would also tie in the emotional meaning with the physical one as usually physically irritating things often take a while to became noticeable. I wouldn't want to suggest this as a hard fast rule though, as there will be times when the two words are truly synonymous.

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    2. I think "irritates" is a stronger emotional expression than "annoys". After long being exposed to it, one feels irritated. Being "annoyed" there is still a possibility of the condition being reversed. Eg: After all these years and the tabloids are still "speculating" over the scandal of ......... It is very irritating. "Your mouth is full, kindly stop talking and spitting food all over. It is very annoying."

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    2. Bother, irritate, and annoy mean the same. Fret means to worry. - Stop bothering me! - Stop annoying me! - Stop irritating me!/ You’re so irritating! - “Please don’t fret; he’ll be fine.”

  • Translations of "Annoy"

    1. Translations
    2. A better sentence: What do you say when somebody annoys me? OR What do you say when somebody is annoying? Responses... Leave me alone! Get away from me! Stop it! You’re bothering me! Knock-it-off! You’re being a pain!

  • Other questions about "Annoy"

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    2. There are two very different ways to use these words in English. The first is to use 'kind' and 'sort' (and 'type') when you are talking about different categories or groups of things. And the second way to use 'kind' and 'sort' (but not 'type') is by expressing uncertainty about something. 'Kind of', 'sort of', and 'type of' when speaking of categories or groups of things: This type / kind / sort of ___. These types / sorts / sorts of ___. All types / kinds / sorts of ___. What kind of music do you like? What are the different kinds of spices in this cake? That magazine prints fake news and all sorts of other rubbish. Kind + of = kinda and sort + of = sorta are used in more informal contexts to establish uncertainty when speaking or writing in English. I'm kinda cold, can you close the window? Do you like tomatoes? Mmm, sorta. We also use 'kind of' (kinda) and 'sort of' (sorta) in English when we do not want to give our opinion or offend someone. In the first example, the person is using "kinda" because she is a bit cold, but also because she is more polite than saying "I'm cold." Close the window. ", Which sounds much more aggressive. In the second example, the person may actually like tomatoes more or less, but in that case, she was probably also wanting to be polite to whoever offered the tomatoes, then the "sorta" here means "no." The two words mean the same thing in this context. In replies, they can be interpreted as "more or less" and sometimes can also express the idea of ​"a little." Meaning "a little": Who is that actor? Oh, he used to be kinda famous back in the 90s. Meaning "too much": How's my writing paper? Um, it still kinda / sorta needs some work. Meaning indecision: So, are you guys, like, together? Well, we're kinda / sorta boyfriend / girlfriend. When you're lazy or indecisive: Do you wanna go out tonight? Mmm ... kinda / sorta, not really, maybe, but yeah, okay. Used with sarcasm, meaning the opposite of what is said, as in this headline published by a newspaper: Today Is (Kinda, Sorta, Maybe, Not Really?) Indigenous Peoples Day in San Antonio. This type of negative talk makes me feel kind of uncomfortable. What kind of music do you like? I really love hip-hop, but I sorta also like different kinds of rock music. We sometimes use some before sort, type and kind as vague expressions: She has made some sort of sweet for the party. There’s some kind of strange smell in here.

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    2. All of these are informal. "Kind of" and "sort of" mean the same thing. They both mean "a bit", "somewhat". And "some kind of", "some sort of" mean the same thing. "Kind of" and "sort of" can be followed with a noun or an adjective. He's kind of a jerk. I'm kind of sad. It's kind of a dangerous place. "Some kind of" or "some sort of" is followed by a noun. What are you - some kind of a wise guy? So all of your examples are right in informal English.

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    2. here’s an example: The sign got me while I was on the road. Basically the sign caught their attention

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    2. I had a conversation with a friend looking for a partner last night. He was annoyed because his family keeps getting in the way. >I’m not sure that has the same meaning you intend, but it’s my best guess

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    2. It sounds natural, but it implies that your personality is annoying to me, or something similar. Apologizing for that seems kind of sarcastic. "I'm sorry that I annoyed you" is good if you're actually sorry for something you did.

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    2. This makes a lot more sense then the second sentence in the original post. "She was flattered by his jelousy, but it could get annoying at times." Would be more natural. At least if I'm fully understanding your intent. Hope that helps.

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