Questions about example sentences with, and the definition and usage of "Candidate"

The meaning of "Candidate" in various phrases and sentences

Q: What does The last candidate says he is a major in the reserves. mean?
A: He is a relatively high ranking member of the military, specifically the Reserves.

The Reserves are only called in as a last resort, and may not be considered "real military" by other members.
Q: What does candidate mean?
A: a person who applies for a job or is nominated for election.
Q: What does articulate candidate mean?
A: someone who can clearly explain and describe something.
Q: What does If that candidate had been held up to the test of our core values, it would have been a much easier pass mean?
A: Held up to the test of our core values means if he had represented our core values better he would have had an easier time, maybe elected. Example, if Donald Trump had more of the core values of the republican party they might have an easier time accepting him. (an easier pass,= not alienated from the republican party) I hope that helps

Example sentences using "Candidate"

Q: Please show me example sentences with candidate .
A: - You're the best candidate for this job.

- He officially announced himself as a candidate.

- She was the strongest candidate for the position.

- They had to find the strongest candidate possible.

- There was a list of available candidates.

Synonyms of "Candidate" and their differences

Q: What is the difference between He is a likely candidate to take over from James as CEO. and He is likely a candidate to take over from James as CEO. ?
A: This is a subtle difference. “He is a likely candidate...” means that there is a good chance that he will get the CEO job. You would use that phrase to talk about someone you thought was in a good position to get the job.
The other phrase is harder to explain. Imagine that you knew that three people had been selected to be interviewed for the CEO job. You are not sure who the three are, but you think it likely that the person you are talking about is one of them. Then you would say “He is likely (to be) a candidate to take over...”. The ‘to be’ is optional, but it is better grammar to include it.
Q: What is the difference between candidate and applicant ?
A: Candidate is synonymous with applicant.

Candidate is a person who applies for a job or is nominated for election.

Applicant is a person who makes a formal application for something, especially a job.

The different in a job (for example) is an applicant is someone who has applied for a job. A candidate is someone who has been vetted through the application process and is a strong consideration for hire.
Q: What is the difference between candidate and applicant ?
A: For a school, there are only applicants. No one would be selected to go to a school without their wanting to go there.
A candidate is someone nominated for an award or position. For example, there are candidates for awards at the Grammys or Oscars (or other award shows).
Because everyone being considered for admission to a school has to apply, they are all applicants.
Q: What is the difference between A candidate must submit an application before human resources will schedule an interview. and A candidate must submit an application before human resources schedule an interview. ?
A: The first one is they have to submit in order for human resources to schedule an interview and the second is they must submit before human resources do schedule an interview
Q: What is the difference between Each candidate and Every candidate ?
A: They're normally interchangeable

But

I hurt each leg - implies only a pair (2 legs)
I hurt every leg - implies more than one pair (3+ legs)

Also
They cost $30 each - OK
They cost $30 every - BAD

Translations of "Candidate"

Q: How do you say this in English (US)? I would like to introduce myself as a suitable/proper candidate for a semester abroad at the University of California?
A: "I would like to be a suitable candidate for a semester abroad at the University of California."
Q: How do you say this in English (UK)? candidate agya h.uska interview schedule h.
A: Check the question to view the answer
Q: How do you say this in English (US)? candidates
A: Check the question to view the answer
Q: How do you say this in English (US)? I would like to use "candidate" for a company. which word is proper?
A: I'm sorry, I don't understand exactly what you are trying to ask, could you perhaps ask it in a different way.

Other questions about "Candidate"

Q: This qualifies one to be a candidate for king .

What does “one” mean ?
a direct object ?
A: It's referring to a generic person.
Q: You have to be fully qualified to be considered a candidate. does this sound natural?
A: You have to be fully qualified to be considered (as) a candidate.

Yes, I think "as" is needed in this sentence. I would say "as", but I wanted to be sure that I'm giving you the right answer, so I googled it. To be honest the differences that I read are unclear to me. I think it's just whether or not "as" (or "to be") sounds right in each sentence.

I did stumble upon (come across) this page that I thought you might enjoy reading.
https://dictionaryblog.cambridge.org/2015/01/28/think-long-and-hard-the-language-of-decisions/
Q: He was once one of a strong candidate for Korean president, but he failed th last election. does this sound natural?
A: He was once a strong candidate FOR Korean president, but he failed THE last election.
Q: I changed the candidate after reading the pledges on cover letters delivered by mail.
I will vote for the person tomorrow Election Day early in the morning. does this sound natural?
A: I would say,
I changed the candidate that I am voting for after reading the pledges on the cover letters delivered by mail.
I will vote for this person on Election Day tomorrow early in the morning.
Q: I want to know if the vacant is open or if you found a candidate, thanks does this sound natural?
A: • I want to know if the vacancy is open, or if you found a candidate.

Though- we don't really use "candidate" except in politics.

So if this about applying for a job..

• I'd like to know if the vacancy is still available, or if you've hired someone.

• Do you have any vacancies at the moment? I'm interested in interviewing for a position here.

• Has the vacancy been filled? I'd like to apply for the position.


And if you are job searching, have your Resume and Cover Letter, and make appointments! :)

Meanings and usages of similar words and phrases

Latest words

candidate

HiNative is a platform for users to exchange their knowledge about different languages and cultures. We cannot guarantee that every answer is 100% accurate.