Questions about example sentences with, and the definition and usage of "Clause"

The meaning of "Clause" in various phrases and sentences

Q: What does if clauses mean?
A: If clause is a part of a sentence with IF, usually when we talk about conditional sentences.
For example,
If the weather is good, we'll go for a walk.
I would go out if it wasn't that cold.
Q: What does clause mean?
A: "Clause" means
1)  a group of words that contain a subject and predicate that function as a member of a complex or compound sentence.
"When they left work they went to the restaurant."
After winning the game the team tore down the goalposts."
2)a separate section of a discourse or writing, specifically a distinct article in a formal document.
"The second clause in the contract includes how the contract can be terminated."
"They added a clause in the prenuptial agreement specifying what happens in case of a divorce."
Q: What does How to think about the clause in this sentence: We're looking at the benefits of systems which control their speed as a way of preventing that. mean?
A: We're looking at the benefits of systems which control their speed // as a way of preventing that.

as in:

As a way of preventing that, we're looking at systems which control their speed.
Q: What does What does this clause mean? mean?
A: Voldemort tried to curse Harry. The curse rebounded, and hit Voldemort.
Q: What does "clause" mean?
A: It's a part of a sentence.
"I eat everyday. I don't like milk."
I eat everyday is the first clause.
I don't like milk is the second clause

Example sentences using "Clause"

Q: Please show me example sentences with Relative clauses and adverbial clauses.
A: @7vkuzminadasha
- adverb clause: “I stopped shooting the gun once it ran out of bullets.” here, the adverb clause describes when i stopped shooting.

- relative clause: “I stopped shooting the gun that ran out of bullets.” here, the relative clause describes the gun.

- relative clause: “The gun, which ran out of bullets, stopped firing.” here, the relative clause adds extra information about the subject.

basically, an adverb clause modifies the main verb, and a relative clause modifies the main noun. i hope that helps 🙂
Q: Please show me example sentences with conditional clause.
A: yeah, it is more common to say the first sentence even if it is not technically correct like you said.
but if you want to say something about location you would say “If I had been there, I would have...” or “If I had been here earlier, I would have...”
Or if you were talking about a past event, you use “had”
ex) If I HAD worked harder, I would have gotten better grades

but in most other cases people usually just say “If I were”
ex) If I were richer, I would buy this car
ex) If you were older, you could have this job
some people also say “If I was you” or “If I was (adjective)”, which also makes sense ( for I only )

it is easy to understand both sentences you said, this is just to sound more natural

hopefully that makes sense!!

Q: Please show me example sentences with A) It is interesting that (clause)

B) It is serious that (clause)
.
A: A) It is interesting that people laugh when they are embarrassed.
A) It is interesting that there is an island full of bunnies in Japan.
A) It is interesting that you ask that.

B) It is serious that his aunt was sent to the hospital.
B) It is serious that I ran out of money.
B) It is serious that she forgot to pay her bills.

Q: Please show me example sentences with What clauses..
A: "I'm sure that what I need right now is to get some sleep"

"He told them what he knew about the accident"

"They are being very narrow-minded, what may bring them a few problems later"

"She has put a lot of money into the project, what has come as a big surprise for everyone"

"He knows how to make a fire, what may come in handy if we get lost in the woods"

Q: Please show me example sentences with that clause and which clause.
A: http://www.grammar-monster.com/glossary/clause.htm

Synonyms of "Clause" and their differences

Q: What is the difference between Special clause and Special contract ?
A: A clause is part of a contract.

A contract is a legally binding agreement between two parties. A written contract consists of specific provisions, or clauses. Clauses define the rights and obligations each party has under the agreement.
Q: What is the difference between clause and provision ?
A: @sjshajjnsgs
In grammar, a clause is a group of words containing a verb. Sentences contain one or more clauses.
or
A clause is a section of a legal document.
Ex:
1. He has a clause in his contract which entitles him to a percentage of the profits.

The provision of something is the act of giving it or making it available to people who need or want it.
or
It can mean something that has been given or supplied, or it can mean things that are set aside for a trip or journey.
Ex:
1. The department is responsible for the provision of residential care services.
Q: What is the difference between clause and sentence ?
A: A sentence is a complete statement whereas a clause is just part of it. An example of a clause is, "When the sun went down" or "because I had run out of coffee". A sentence might be, "When the sun went down, I drove to the supermarket because I had run out of coffee". The MAIN clause is the clause that can stand on its own, in this case "I drove to the supermarket". Of course, a sentence can consist of just one clause e.g. "I went to the cinema yesterday".
Q: What is the difference between that clause and which clause ?
A: Somewhat correct, but it depends on the context. "which" can also be used in referring to people abilities, characteristics, etc.
Q: What is the difference between which and where on relative clause ?
A: 'I went to the store, where I saw my friend Allison.' (Be careful here; if there were no comma, it would mean that the listener already knows that there's a store where I saw her, and I'm telling which store I more recently went to. With the comma, a specific store is already implied or understood, and I'm saying that I saw her on this particular trip to that store.) 'I went to the store, which is located next to the library.' 'Which' gives more information about the thing mentioned before. If the listener already knows that there's a store next to the library and I'm specifying which one I went to, I would just say 'I went to the store next to the library.'

Translations of "Clause"

Q: How do you say this in English (US)? I am still wondering about when the main clause has future tense, what kinds of tenses the subordinate clause has.
If possible, please give examples.
,
A: I wish I could help, but unfortunately I’m no expert when it comes to technical English grammar.

These sound like great questions to ask an English teacher/professor though. I’m sure they would have a much better answer than I would.

The examples I gave may not be 100% grammatically correct, but they sounded correct/natural to my ears. I would double check with an English textbook/teacher just to be sure.

Again, I’m sorry I wasn’t able to answer your question, but I wish you luck in finding answers!
Q: How do you say this in English (US)? According to clause 62: The medical institution shall respect the patient's right to be informed of the diagnosis and treatment of his/her condition, and shall make necessary explanations to the patient during their special examination. Natural?
A: Oh also, one more thing!

Earlier you used “his/her” for pronouns, but later, you used “their”
(... their special examination.)

I recommend sticking to one type of pronoun throughout the paper.

“Their special examination” —> “his/her special examination”
Q: How do you say this in English (US)? clause
A: Check the question to view the answer
Q: How do you say this in English (UK)? i don't know how to do these relative clauses (32 and 33).
Ex: The dog is playful. The dog has a ball
The dog which jas a ball is playful.
A: My brother lives in a city,which is in Scotland
Liz was in a very bad mood that her car had broken down

Other questions about "Clause"

Q: Can you explain this clause to me?

''Not once did I ever hear the message that .... ''
A: It’s means ‘I have never heard the message that...’ // not once = never
Q: If you try to literally translate the 明日の~うかるか into an if clause, the sentence will be awkward. "I'm afraid that" is by far the more natural than "I'm afraid if" in English.

明日の N4の しけんに うかるか ふあんだ。
"I'm afraid I won't pass the N4 exam." Does this sound natural?
A: "I'm afraid that"
"I'm afraid if" means "I'm afraid if ___ happens then ___ will happen(always a negative thing)"
Q: "if he’d be interested in" - Is it a conditional clause? and what type? First, Second, or Third?
-
Several years ago, David Nelson got a message from a recruiter asking if he’d be interested in a design job at Microsoft.
A: No, it is not a conditional clause. It is what we call reported speech.

*Would you be interested in a design job at Microsoft? - The recruiter asked David.

The recruiter asked David if he would (he'd) be interested in a design job at Microsoft.

We use the connector "if" because that is the connector we use in reported speech if it is a close question (yes/no answer).
Q: What are the main clauses here?
Please remove your backpack and hold it by hand when inside the trains.
"Remove and hold"?
A: That's the main clause, the "when inside the train" is a minor clause which just adds more information, but without it, the main clause still makes sense.
Q: What does the first clause mean in this sentence: aging leaves mental status mostly intact, a slower response time may affect new learning.
A: When people get older (=age), their intelligence (=mental status) doesn't change very much (=remains intact).

Meanings and usages of similar words and phrases

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