Questions about example sentences with, and the definition and usage of "Extent"

  • The meaning of "Extent" in various phrases and sentences

    1. Meanings of words and phrases
    2. This is difficult to explain, but I will try! So I know in Japan it is usually translated to mean that you want to kill the person you're talking to. This is not true! Much like how 気持ち悪い is difficult to translate into English, because it expresses a general negative feeling, and there is no way to say that in English. So, "f*** you" is a way to express a general negative opinion of the person you are talking to, but in a very strong way. It can also be used jokingly by good friends. In America, "f***" is one of the strongest swear words, but many people swear a lot. Many people would tell you that it's not that bad, but some people would say it's very bad. Either way, you definitely should not use it at work, or anywhere else where you should be polite. Let me know if you have any other questions!

    1. Meanings of words and phrases
    2. drying (theater slang) = completely forgetting your lines and being unable to recover or make something up to continue the scene to the extent ~ = as much as or more than ~ he forgot his lines to the extent no actor has ever forgotten his lines = he forgot his lines in a way that was worse than any other actor

    1. Meanings of words and phrases
    2. An easier way to describe it would be to make sure there are no mistakes at all. Example: “I will go to the fullest extent possible to make sure everything goes smoothly.” I hope this could help!

  • Similar words to "Extent" and their differences

    1. Similar words
    2. "Extent" is about the depth of something. For example, he loves soccer, to the extent that he can play it all day long. "Scale" is about the width. It's more quantitative. For example, the scale of this project is $100 million. (Quantity) The scale of this program ranges from helping the disabled to promoting clean energy. (Width)

    1. Similar words
    2. Correct that can pretty much be used interchangeably

    1. Similar words
    2. Yup. We use 'more or less' when we want to compare or describe something that is closer/similar to an actual thing/situation.

  • Other questions about "Extent"

    1. Other types of questions
    2. I’m Chinese American. I would say quite a lot actually. I’m the oldest of three sisters. Up until I was five, my household used Chinese only. Now I hear both English and Mandarin in my household, but I can definitely say that my Mandarin is no where near the level my English is at. I can hold conversations in Mandarin; however, I have a hard time reading (of course Chinese uses characters instead of an alphabet like Korean or English) since I dropped out of Chinese school at like age 10. I regret it now. My middle sister is five years younger than me and is even worse at Mandarin than me since our household started using English more often than Chinese when I went into elementary school. Whereas I use Mandarin 60% of the time when talking to my parents, my middle sister uses it about 5% of the time. My youngest sister was sent to China for her first three years after being born. She spoke Chinese well with the local dialect and sang nursery rhymes like any other Chinese toddler. Once she got back, she only heard English so she lost pretty much all of her Chinese. She also maybe uses Mandarin 5% of the time at home. However, she has a better accent when it comes to speaking than my middle sister. So basically, how we grew up really affected how much Chinese we each knew.

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    2. ‘To begin with, I do not agree with the reason and argue that college and university students prefer to make their own decisions than to follow directions.’ *This part is unnecessary, you repeat the exact same thing as your previous paragraph. You should delete this. The GRE writing test, like any other standardized test, is looking for concise writing that gets your message across. College students and university students have to abide by rigid rules in high school and thus must be tired of following directions rather than making their own decisions. *Commas are only used with two independent clauses. The previous sentence does not need one. Also there shouldn’t be an article in front of ‘high school’. Of course, supporters would argue that since students are accustomed to following directions, they are also be willing to follow the guidance of the university or college. However, even if some students prefer to follow direction, college and universities should allow them make their decision on their own as such a capability is really essential for them to live the world. * Everything in the past few sentences are very repetitive. Often there is a misconception that more words = better writing, but it’s not true! *Colleges and universities are analogous so you don’t need to keep saying both; just using one is fine! For instance, there is a well-known theory called the responsible mindset theory in sociology. This theory argues that responsibility can be raised by practicing decision making by individuals themselves and the capability of making a decision is important to succeed. *In formal writing you want to avoid intensifiers such as very and really! This is because no one can succeed and live their life successfully just by following guidance. Grounded the example (I’ve never heard this before? Would ‘Given this example’ be better?) I believe that students do not prefer to follow the directions and even if they prefer it, the university should have them make their decisions by themselves in order to raise their responsibility. *Again, this is repetitive. By providing the example of the theory, you are implying that you think the university should allow more freedom for students. This isn’t necessary until you’ve made all you points at the end.

    1. Other types of questions
    2. I would say: I got a bit tense at the job interview, but I guess it’s understandable.

    1. Other types of questions
    2. She was driven into a corner to such an extent that she had no choice but to turn the suspicion towards someone/something she did not want to believe had any connection with the incident at all. ...she did not want to believe should be suspected at all.

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    2. There are a lot of nice people in this world. (natural) Sometimes, a few of them will call me "baby", or "sweetheart", even though we just met, but I think that it's rude. I respect those who are really good people deep down inside from the bottom of my heart, and, if possible, I want to connect with those people forever. However, there are some who change personalities after some time, or some who only want to talk about sexual topics when we get along well to a certain extent, and that's really vulgar. I particularly don't like sexual topics, so I feel strange whenever I meet such a person. That's why I'm really grateful to my friends for respecting my opinions. They respect me. Their words express that they will not be vulgar towards me. I really appreciate it. If you have any questions please ask in reply

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    2. Depends on the context which one you would use Scope is a a depth or reach of something. The scope of abuse would be how "big"/spread the abuse is (at a certain place for example) Extent is the limit, so how severe the abuse is. I wouldn't use magnitude, it's... "too vast", if you will, for a subject of abuse

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