Questions about example sentences with, and the definition and usage of "Have"

The meaning of "Have" in various phrases and sentences

Q: What does have divined mean?
A: Check the question to view the answer
Q: What does you have~still?
still mean?
A: I'm not sure how good your English is so i'll give examples instead!
Example 1:
A gives B a pen. (At 1pm)
*1 hour later* (2pm)
A:"Do you still have the pen?"
B:"Yes I do."
(Pen is with B after an hour.)

Example 2:
A gives B a pen. (At 1pm)
B gives the pen to C.
*1 hour later* (2pm)
A: "Do you still have the pen?"
B: "No I do not."
(B does not have the pen anymore.)

'Still' is used to refer to the present time.
In this case, 'still' refers to whether B has the pen at the time A asked B. (At 2pm)

Hope this helps!

Q: What does "You haven't heard the last of this,"he snarled. mean?
A: The speaker is angry. It is clear that he will continue to argue or fight about this issue in the future.

この喧嘩はまだ終わりません。
Q: What does you have to remain come down. mean?
A: You have to get relaxed, feel at ease.
Q: What does have you finished yet? mean?
A: it means it is asking you if you have done it already or asking you if you have completely accomplished it.

Example sentences using "Have"

Q: Please show me example sentences with have yet to do.
A: I've yet to do/finish my essay.
I've yet to apologize to her.

This isn't normally used in conversation, most people simply say "I haven't (done)..."

I haven't done/finished my essay.
I haven't apologized to her.
Q: Please show me example sentences with has he ever....? .
A: Has he ever been to Japan?
Has he ever bought new clothes by himself?
Has he ever read the book?
Q: Please show me example sentences with only have to (do).
A: I only have to think of a sentence.

I only have to feed fish to the penguins.

On Sunday I only have to mow the lawn.

I only have to take one suitcase on the train.
Q: Please show me example sentences with we have made.
A: We have made a lot of mistakes.

We have made up our minds.
Q: Please show me example sentences with I have to admit.
A: Here is an example sentence:

"I like to eat a lot of candy, but I have to admit that eating a lot of candy is not healthy."

Synonyms of "Have" and their differences

Q: What is the difference between have to and have got to ?
A: "You have to do it." Both the same. "You have got to do it"

Have is understood by the listener to mean they have no choice. Otherwise should would be used in it's place. Got is then redundant and dropped in common speech.

Got is often included when the speaker is trying hard to convince the listener to help them. This would be close to pleading and usually uses guilt of some kind to convince the listener.
Q: What is the difference between he has gone and he passed out ?
A: "He has passed out on the couch."
This implies "he" has fallen asleep on the couch.

"He passed out paper to the students."
This implies "he" handed paper out to the students.

"He has gone to the store."
This implies "he" left the place where he was and went to the store.

Does that make sense?
Q: What is the difference between have and possess ?
A:
Great question

Have is the Old English word, while Possess is from Latin and probably entered English from the French spoken by the invaders of 1066.

When you have two words identical in meaning, but one is French-origin and the other is Old English, the difference is subtle, but almost always the same:

If it's French, it expresses the position of the ruling class
If it's English, it expresses the position of the working class

So, possession is explicitly about power and ownership

-I possess all of these lands

While having is as often simply about use and proximity

-Do you have that hammer?

Hope that helps 😀
Q: What is the difference between I won't have you speak in the public and I won't have you speaking in the public ?
A: “I won’t have you speak in the public” is a phrase before the action is done. “I won’t have you speaking in public” is phrase that is about something that is currently happening, hence the -ing at the end of speaking. Not about the question, but “the” in both sentences should be taken out to make it sound more natural.
Q: What is the difference between He has studied English. and He has been studying English. ?
A: "He has studied English at my university."

"He has been studying English at my university."

These two sentences sound similar, but the first one is past tense.
It's something that did happen but is no longer happening.

The second sentence is something that happened in the past but is still occurring. Hopefully, that makes sense.

Translations of "Have"

Q: How do you say this in English (US)? You have beautiful eyelash/eyelashes. ???🤔
A: You have beautiful eyelashes. 🕵🏼
Q: How do you say this in English (UK)? have I made you angry? naturally
A: you can also say "have i made you mad?"
or
"are you angry with me?"
Q: How do you say this in English (US)? i have eaten enough
A: @chaosXTY: I'm full, I'm done eating
Q: How do you say this in English (US)? How have you been? に対する答え
A: "I've been good" is perfect. You can also say "Not to bad." "I've been doing OK." "I've been quite busy." "I've been going through a tough time." etc.
Q: How do you say this in English (US)? have been send
A: Have been sent, or has been sent, depending on the situation and object.

Other questions about "Have"

Q: I had to go there
I had have to go there
I had to went to there
I could meet/met you does this sound natural?
A: "i had to go there so I could meet you"
Q: I’m confused(
Can you speak :
Have you any idea?
I haven’t a clue.
Or
Do you have any idea?
I haven’t got a clue does this sound natural?
A: The second option sound natural
Q: How have you been doing? does this sound natural?
A: Most people would say: How have you been?
Q: what has happens? does this sound natural?
A: "What has happened?" but it's more common to just say "What happened?"
Q: 1) I have got to like her.
2) I have become fond of her.
Both are natural? does this sound natural?
A: Both of these are correct, however they can imply two different things.

“I have got to like her.” - This May imply that you don’t WANT to like her, but you have to anyway.

“I have become fond of her.” - This implies that you started out not liking her or you were indifferent to her when you met, but you have now gotten to a point where you like her.

Meanings and usages of similar words and phrases

Latest words

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