Questions about example sentences with, and the definition and usage of "Native"

The meaning of "Native" in various phrases and sentences

Q: What does You don't have to pass as a native speaker. mean?
A: to pass as something = to appear to be something to other people; to look like you are something

You don't have to pass as a native speaker. = It is not necessary to seem like a native speaker. It is OK if people do not think you are native.
Q: What does Which one is right?(*just native speakers)

Different people suit different jobs.

or

Different people is suited different jobs. mean?
A: The first one
Q: What does When I met a native english teacher, she asked my name and I said I am Hailey!
And she said "Yes! you look so Hailey!"
Do you guys have any idea what she meant? mean?
A: She thought that your physical appearance and your name go together well. (it is a silly remark)
Q: What does native mean?
A: The race/culture who were the first in a country.
Q: What does native mean?
A: ネイティブ / 現地人 Native means somewhere from which something originates, or the original people to inhabit a land or area

Example sentences using "Native"

Q: Please show me example sentences with Be due to/ due to ( only British English native speakers please.).
A: I will be late for the meeting due to the cancellation of my train service.
The restaurant is closed due to the lockdown.
My blood sugar is high due to my diabetes
I can’t get online. Could it be due to my network provider?
They aren’t answering the phone, It could be due to increased demand due to Covid-19.
Q: Please show me example sentences with ‘With that caveat’ Do the natives use this expression often? I found my favorite professor use this expression quite often in classroom, and I kinda love this expression, especially in that it sounds posh! Haha.
A:

It is fairly posh 😁

I never heard that word throughout my entire childhood ... then I started to socialise with lawyers.

It's more common than it used to be. People say things like:

I have just one caveat
As usual, remember - caveat emptor!
I might add one more caveat...

Etc

Q: Please show me example sentences with native brother/sister.
A: But referring to siblings overall, people don't really specify that it's their full sister/brother cause it's more or less a given, instead they mention when their siblings are their half/step siblings, like stepbrother etc.
Q: Please show me example sentences with native.
A: As an adjective:
I am a native English speaker.

As a noun:
Where are the natives in the US?

Synonyms of "Native" and their differences

Q: What is the difference between native and Local ?
A: @Nfini
Native refers to a person who grew up or was born in a certain place. It can also refer to places, plants and animals of indigenous origins.

Local refers to a person living in or nearby a certain place.

e.g.
"Marco is an Italian native."
"Marco lives in Milan. He is a local."
Q: What is the difference between native to and native of ?
A: Use “native to” when you’re talking about a category, characteristic, or species. - The Aztecs were native to current day Mexico. (category of people)
- There is a unique business culture native to the U.S. (characteristic)
- The poison dart frog is native to the tropical rainforest. (species)

Use “native of” when you’re talking about where a person was born.
- He is a native of Scotland.
Q: What is the difference between ‘squirrel’ is difficult even for a native speaker and ‘squirrel’ is difficult also for a native speaker ?
A: Here 'even' sounds right to me.

The second sentence sounds as if it should b:

'Squirrel' is also difficult for a native speaker.

But, that doesn't have the same meaning. It means something more like:

ネーティーブの人にとって、「squirrel」も難しいです。
Q: What is the difference between be a native of and be native to ?
A: “Be a native of” most likely is referring to a person who was born and raised in a certain area. “She is a native of Korea.”

“Be native to” can be used to talk about where something originates from. “This flower is native to India.” So it grew first in India, though you may see it in other places. Another example would be, “X animal is a native species.”, meaning they come from wherever you happen to be saying the sentence!
Q: What is the difference between Japanese native speaker and native Japanese speaker ?
A: they are the same

Translations of "Native"

Q: How do you say this in English (US)? native
A: Check the question to view the answer
Q: How do you say this in English (US)? native
Q: How do you say this in English (US)? native
A: Native (Ney-tiv)
Q: How do you say this in English (US)? what is the native way to say gloat at someone in english
A: Bragged, or to brag.
Q: How do you say this in English (US)? ​​How do you say I need English native speaker like partner to practice English and Arabic in English (US)?
A: I would like a Language partner to practice English and Arabic

Other questions about "Native"

Q: there are many many native people of almost all kinds of languages. Does this sound natural?
A: I do not completely understand what you're trying to say, but...

"There are many people who can speak many foreign languages fluently like the natives." (BTW they're called 'polyglots'.)
Q: ☀️English native speakers only please ✨I’ve just stepped on the ninth year in my (acting) career.
(役者として)9年目に突入

I hope I can attract many people in various ways .. I really hope so.
今年は色んな形で魅せたい、、よね。

Then.... そして
Happy new year! あけましておめでとうございます
I hope you guys support me this year as well. 本年もよろしくお願いします


Does this sound natural?
A: @mimi444 あー、なるほど。

そう言う場合なら、「I’ve just stepped into the ninth year of my acting career.」 の方が良いと思います。
Q: ⭐️English native speakers only please ⭐️I’ve just stepped on the ninth year in my (acting) career.
(役者として)9年目に突入

I hope I can attract many people in various ways ..I really hope so.
今年は色んな形で魅せたい、、よね。

Then.... そして
Happy new year! あけましておめでとうございます
I hope you guys support me this year as well. 本年もよろしくお願いします


Does this sound natural?
A: @mimi444 I suspect your correct. The full sentence is probably "This year I want to, in all the ways I can .... enchant (people/ audiences/ etc.)."

But to me it also sounds fine without.
People might say "I want to captivate.' "I want enchant." "I want to mesmerise."
Or even "I want to try." "I want to speak.' or "I want to sing."
While "I want to sang." (sang -> intransitive) is incorrect.
Having said that you can't say "I want to do." It needs something after it. "I want to do it."

As a native, I really couldn't tell you why it's okay. Or why some verbs sound fine without an object and others aren't :(
Q: As a native can you easily understand all these sentences ? Are they common in everyday use?

It is speckled.
He was peeved
The mode of production has changed.
The company had a large deficit
They supply copra
He practised the trill.
Is this the right figure?
It had a retro look
This puree is bright green
They were rollicking
Many unwanted plants are ubiquitous
They have a bidet
He broke the strap
His malign is still felt.
A: 'It is speckled' -> 'It's speckled' and it's not very common but that's because there aren't lots of speckled things in the world, we might even say 'dotted' instead (it's more common).

'He was peeved' -> sounds quite fancy so you don't hear it very often, but you might see it in a book.

'The mode of production has changed' Yeah

'The company had a large deficit' Very natural

'The supply copra' -> I had no idea that copra was even a word! I had to look it up. This would be natural to say if you, for whatever reason, think the other person would know a specific term like that.

'He practised the trill' -> I suppose if you were talking about a piece of music you might say that, although it's very rare to hear this. You might say 'He practised the trills in the song'.

'Is this the right figure?' Yep

'It had a retro look' Sounds nice

'This puree is bright green' -> This makes sense but if you say 'this' it means the other person can see it so I'm not sure why you would say that as they can see it too, so they know it's bright green. You might use it if you were for some reason shocked the puree was green (e.g. 'This puree is bright green! It looks like sick.')

'They were rollicking' -> Definitely not common. I didn't even know that was a word, it sounds like it was used in the past but not anymore.

'Many unwanted plants are ubiquitous' -> Ubiquitous is a very fancy word that some people might know the definition but it still is not well-known, but sounds cool. It would be more natural to say 'Many commonly found plants are unwanted' or 'Many commonly found plants are treated as weeds'.

'They have a bidet' - Natural, but very few people have one.

'He broke the strap' Ding-ding! Yep

'His malign is still felt' -> Not grammatical. Malign is an adjective or verb but here it's being used as a noun. You could say 'His malign influence is still felt'.
Q: The young English native speaker go to work in Asia as English teachers without special training of teach. Does this sound natural?
A: The young native English speaker goes to work in Asia as an English teacher without any special teacher training.

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