Questions about example sentences with, and the definition and usage of "Professionally"

  • The meaning of "Professionally" in various phrases and sentences

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    2. @Iwami: @Sam3679KCM: Thank you both!

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    2. Yes - "Don't give up your day job!" is a phrase that implies that you wouldn't find a suitable job in the thing you like. It's kind of a mean thing to say but usually said as a joke. For what it's worth your English is great so if you want to - Do quit your day job! ;).

  • Example sentences using "Professionally"

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    2. To do something professionally means to work efficiently and thoroughly which is usually seen by people who are well trained in what they are doing

  • Other questions about "Professionally"

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    2. 's answer is professional and the layout is very good. You can use it exactly as he wrote it.

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    2. I used to speed skate professionally when I was in elementary school through middle school, but now I don't skate anymore. I only do yoga now. or I learnt how to speed skate professionally when I was in elementary school through middle school, but now I don't do it anymore. I only do yoga now. Minor changes, good job.

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    2. "I started working as a swim instructor after I came back to Australia. Though, right after I begun my shift, I started to get the feeling that this job was not going to go as smoothly as I had expected. First, I totally forgot that I don’t even like a public swimming pool. Swimmers in the pool would also leave behind body myriad of lots of unpleasant materials, which I didn’t even want to know. Yuk. Since I was working as a swim instructor and lifeguard, I often needed to teach swimming to kids mostly under age 10. Then I noticed that as a instructor, I couldn’t control over 10 students by myself in many ways. For example, I could not let my students hop in and out of practice to pee... (This is very confusing for reader to understand. If you mean they do their business in the pool. Say that) I even noticed that it's pretty rare that being told that they need to go to bathroom my kids, which sent my OCD into "violent bursts." all the time. (It was pretty rare the kids would tell you they had to use the bathroom. This caused my OCD into “violent bursts” all the time However, I got attached to my students. This was also why I didn't like teaching them. Every time I let them line up and swim one by one, there were certain difference of swimming level between kids. When I was a kid, I always swam in the ocean, and no one compared me to anyone. I literally learned to swim naturally. I don't think I can swim properly or professionally like other swim instructor. I just wanted to teach kids how fun and relaxing swimming is. " Editor: pay attention to tenses. You need to stay consistent. When you are talking about the past- stay in past tense. When you are at that moment continuing a present thought, use present tense. You need to stay in one tense except in present tense occasions. Your commas are a little messed up when you bring in additional info or thoughts. For example: My friends, Bob and Jenny, will be going to the store. When you bring in additional information. You need commas always. You can check this by seeing if the rest of the sentence works with out the additional info. - My friends, Bob and Jenny, will be going to the store. - My friends will be going to the store. - Also, just if you ever write a professional paper in english- Avoid contractions. They are too non-formal, and it sounds too much like conversation. Besides that- Your spelling is good, story is understandable, and no run on sentences. Good job!

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    2. When it comes to commas, try not to overthink it. As often as there are comma rules, adding an extra one does not always make the sentence invalid. For example, in your second sentence after "20 years old"(which would be hyphenated as "20-years-old"), a comma is necessary before the coordinating conjunction "and". Just as much, the comma before "and" in the third sentence is unnecessary, because it is a compound sentence not a compound-complex. Regardless, no teacher or English-speaker will chastise you for using one-too-many commas or forgetting to add one before a conjunction. The same applies for the three comma rule(list, list, and list). Remember that after a city-state clause you need to add another comma just after the state before continuing the sentence to prevent confusion. In the sixth sentence, you did use the semicolon properly, but all the content that follows until the end of the sentence is run-on. The comma after "rock music" and before "such as" is unnecessary, and the phrase "just to name few" is voided by the earlier phrase "such as". The comma before "which inspired me" is also unnecessary. The comma after "Now" in the seventh sentence is not needed, because "Now" is not a dependent clause. The comma after "new languages" in the eighth sentence is unnecessary as well(don't give up hope!). Regarding the sentence that begins "My goal for now is", you may want to turn it into an active voice sentence rather than passive to unify the paragraph. The rest is perfect! I'm sorry to have run my mouth off with minor details, because in all reality, it's pretty great as it is. It was really cool to get to know a little bit about you, and I hope my tips are helpful. Good luck!

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    2. If you have any concerns working here, tell me about it I have a concern regarding 'efficient reporting and writing skills' I think that your company consists of a lot of paperwork like writing reports or official letters as a public organizaiton. The official words are mostly in Chinese characters, which I may not fully understand. If i’m unable to understand exactly what it means, I won’t be able to utilize the words appropriately. So I will try to improve my reporting skills by practicing more official vocabulary and promptly checking each definition to complete administrative work in a professional manner.

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    2. Collateral damage is damage done to something besides the target. If you throw a ball at a tree, and hit a window of the house behind the tree, the damage done to the house is collateral damage - you didn’t mean to hit the house. In the context of the article, Manafort is saying that Robert Mueller‘s investigation did not mean to damage his life, but it did.

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