Questions about example sentences with, and the definition and usage of "Recession"

The meaning of "Recession" in various phrases and sentences

Q: What does recession mean?
A: A recession is any kind of PULLING BACK from where something once was.
An economic recession is several months of economic slowdown.
Q: What does recession mean?
A: It's an economics thing. A period when most people stop buying things which leads to companies making losses, which results in lower wages and the cycle repeats.
Q: What does the recession is throwing millions on the street mean?
A: Many are out of work - not in houses - homeless

Synonyms of "Recession" and their differences

Q: What is the difference between recession and depression ?
A: @Esho4 i didn't know this i actually googled it. but in a depression there is a higher unemployment rate than in a recession.
Q: What is the difference between The recession has taken a toll on small business owners. and The recession took a toll on small business owners. ?
A: taken and took are actually the same meaning but different past tense. Taken means already done while took means in the process of doing. Here is an example.

(1) Some small business owners have taken a loan out to help keep there business running. (hint they already have done so)

(2)The business owner took there shop to another district for better income.
Q: What is the difference between recession and depression ?
A: Recession is when the economy drops and jobs are lowered but Depression is more like the Great Depression where no one anywhere has money and just making enough money to barely feed yourself is hard. Depression is basically a very bad recession.
Q: What is the difference between recession and depression ?
A: Recession is more of a temporary economic low, depression is a long and severe drop in the economy

Other questions about "Recession"

Q: The recession is in full retreat. does this sound natural?
A: This sounds very good!
Q: Q1
What does "correctly predicted nine of the last five American recessions." mean?
If it said "correctly predicted three (or four or five) of the last five" I would understand.
When 5 things happens, you can not predict more than 5....

Q2
What does "His profession would kill for such accuracy." mean?


Context>>>>>>>>>>
In 1966, four years before securing the Nobel Prize for economics, Paul Samuelson quipped that declines in U.S. stock prices had correctly predicted nine of the last five American recessions. His profession would kill for such accuracy.

With recession talk returning to haunt financial markets and the corridors of central banks, a review of the past suggests that those who are paid to call turning points in economic growth have a dismal record. Unlike the stock market, they’re more likely to miss recessions than to predict ones that never occur. The lowlight, of course, was the widespread failure to forecast America’s Great Recession, which began in December 2007—nine months before Lehman Brothers filed for bankruptcy.
A: They desperately want that kind of accuracy. (Still part of the joke though, saying that 9/5 is better than whatever they actually predict, so they wish they were as accurate as the stick market). “Would kill for” is a phrase that can be used lightly (I would kill for a good hamburger right now) or with things you really wish could happen - (I would kill for a part in that movie). It’s not a super common phrase, but it shows up every once in a while.
Q: Despite the recession having been continued, our department's sales picked up by 15%, and profits increased by 20% last year.
We attributed this success to our product with an excel energy-saving character and our employee's efforts.
Without, however, this energy crisis, there wouldn't be the leap this much in our sales. does this sound natural?
A: Very good, I understand the meaning! I would make small changes:

"...We attributed this success to our product's excellent energy-saving quality and our employees' efforts. Without, however, this energy crisis, there wouldn't be this much of a leap in our sales."

Employee's = 1 person
Employees' = 0, or more than 2 people
Q: In the recession, we can't do anything that our company can stand in the market does this sound natural?
A: Check the question to view the answer

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