Questions about example sentences with, and the definition and usage of "Usage"

The meaning of "Usage" in various phrases and sentences

Q: What does what is the main and common usage of ought ? mean?
A: It's similar to should, maybe a little less harsh. He ought to take better care of himself. ("He should take better care of himself" is more judgmental) That ought to be illegal. (That should be illegal, that shouldn't be legal) "Ought to" can be shortened to "oughta" informally.
Q: What does what's the usage of 'to bless' in the sentence below? and please any other examples of it? "Bts is blessing the AGT stage next Wednesday." mean?
A: The word 'bless' stems from religion- "I am blessed by God" would mean that God looks favourably upon you. But instead of God, it has been appropriated to be used for anyone people deem to be extraordinary or that have God-like power e.g. "my teacher blessed me with good grades". So in the context of your example, they're saying that BTS are like Gods, and that their presence on the stage is a divine gift. 😅
Q: What does what's the usage of 'to bless' in the sentence below? and please any other examples of it? "Bts is blessing the AGT stage next Wednesday." mean?
A: It means they are going to bring honor to that stage by being there to perform.
Q: What does Could you please explain the usage of "to get to"? I've heard native speakers using it quite a lot, but can't figure out how to apply it. Thanks! mean?
A: I generally see it as like ‘to be able’ as in ‘to get the opportunity to...” For example: “Because I take French, I get (the opportunity) to go to France next year.”
Q: What does various usages of '. like get'em. mean?
A: ' is used when shortening words into 1 word. Usually in spoken language.

Example sentences using "Usage"

Q: Please show me example sentences with please give me some usage of "Be". Ex: what is the difference between "Might" and "might be". And behind "might be" is gerund or bare infinitive. Thank you all <3.
A: You are really saying the same thing. Might + be is no different that Might + be + (gerund/noun). Might is usually followed by a base verb (I might go, I might be, I might say). So your question really is "what follows a base verb", because "might be" is just "might" followed by a base verb. The answer is gerund/noun/adjective "I might go to the moon" = "I might be going to the moon". Examples of noun/adjective-"I might be sick, "I might be President".
Q: Please show me example sentences with the usage and distinction of “shall and would.
A: shall can be more a more confident way to ask for something. as in: - shall we dance? (like a proposition) - would you like to dance with me? (a very polite question) when you use "shall" is almost like you already know that they are going to answer with a yes. You wouldn't ask your girlfriend if she would like to dance with you, she is your girlfriend, you know she likes you and probably would say yes
Q: Please show me example sentences with complicated usage of comma.
A: this is the first sentence to a book known as "a tale of two cities" It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to heaven, we were all going direct the other way - in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.
Q: Please show me example sentences with get. there is so much usage in this word. when I use this word I get cinfused..
A: It can mean to buy: I am going to get something at the store. How about we get pizza? It can also mean to make something happen (an event or emotion): Let's get this party started. Let's get excited for tomorrow's trip! Hope this helped! It is a pretty tricky word to explain.

Synonyms of "Usage" and their differences

Q: What is the difference between usage and use ?
A: but use also can be a noun
Q: What is the difference between usage and consumption ?
A: Consumption is 'eating'. You can consume food, energy, resources, anything that is gone after you use it. Usage can mean the same thing but it is more general. It does not imply 'using up'. Just to be complicated, 'consumption' can also describe reading/listening 'internet news consumption is increasing'.
Q: What is the difference between past simple usage and present perfect usage ?
A: It's a little hard to explain, because most native speakers don't actively think about stuff like this, so if you want a better explanation I'd recommend checking out this website: http://www.ef.com/english-resources/english-grammar/present-perfect-vs-simple-past/ Anyway: When you want to specify when you did an action, you should use past simple. It's not required to specify the time of the action, but it sounds a little unusual if you don't. Examples: "He biked earlier today" "We drove to the party last night" If you don't want to say when you did an action, you can use present perfect. This is more for saying you've done an action, but not exactly when you've done it. Examples: "He has biked" "We have been married for 10 years"
Q: What is the difference between "usage of medical algorithms" and "use of medical algorithms" ?
A: Most of the time, "use" and "usage" are interchangeable. The only real difference is that "usage" is always a noun, whereas "use" can be a noun or a verb. "Usage" is also used more often in formal situations. For your specific example, "the usage of medical algorithms" also has a sense of continuity, like it will be used again and again. The "use of medical algorithms" can imply either a one-time use or continuous use.
Q: What is the difference between I often confuse with the usage of these and those. can anyone help me out? ?
A: These are for objects that are near you and those are for objects far away from you. These apples are nice. Those children are naughty

Translations of "Usage"

Q: How do you say this in English (US)? ‎what&#39;s the usage of fierce in the sentence below? &quot;Retweet to say happy birthday to t...
A: Extreme in degree, power or effect.
Q: How do you say this in English (UK)? what's the usage of fierce in the sentence below? "Retweet to say happy birthday to the fierce RM"
A: Hello ARMY!! 💜 Your sentence is a little unnatural You could also say, “Retweet to wish our fierce RM a happy birthday!”
Q: How do you say this in English (UK)? I’m keeping on practicing the usage of the word “feeble”. So, may this sentence sound natural: “L...
A: Living without enough sunlight makes me feel sad/depressed. Living without enough exercise/vitamins makes me feel feeble. She gave him a feeble excuse for being late to dinner. After my knee surgery, my walking is difficult and I'm feeble on my feet.
Q: How do you say this in English (US)? I'm curious of the usage of 'whereby'.
A: I barely ever hear it, an example is "a system whereby people could vote by telephone"
Q: How do you say this in English (US)? usage
A: Check the question to view the answer

Other questions about "Usage"

Q: 1) This mobile usage for this month will be billed on next month. 2) This mobile phone has suspended until someone needs to use it. does this sound natural?
A: "The mobile usage for this month will be billed on the next month." "This mobile phone has been suspended until someone needs to use it." Just minor errors.
Q: The usage of "keen to know" Do you say "the police officer is keen to know where the murderer is."? Or is "keen to know" used only for good things, like, "I am keen to know what souvenir my father will ge...
A: I think it works in both situations.
Q: I'm still confused with the usage of "that" and "it" especially when they mean the same thing. Can anyone help me understand how to use them differently? I understand that that is used to refer to something ...
A: Yep, that's okay.
Q: Could you tell me the usage of both 'electronic' and 'electric'? Thank you.
A: Electronic = computer/small parts Electric = Tools, cars, etc. Things that are whole. That is what I think at least. "He has a electric car." "Look at all the electronics in that computer." "I love using my electric saw." "This electronic watch is pretty neat." Just a few examples I could immediately think of.
Q: What's the usage of ditto?
A: It is another way to agree, or to say- the same

Meanings and usages of similar words and phrases

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