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I’m learning English through the movie The Verdict, and there are some parts or lines the meaning of which I can’t really understand.

For example, I’m not sure the meaning of the line: “Who are the civilians?,” which Frank Galvin, the reading role of this movie, said to a bartender at a bar.

Would you tell me what the line “Who are the civilians?” means? If you would tell me the meaning, I would be very grateful to you.



The context for the line is like the following:


(Galvin is at a bar. To the bartender)
———————————
Frank Galvin: Sorry. Nobody ever stood here since 1952. Give me a Bushmill.

The bartender: Bushmill. ⭐️ Who are the civilians? Lousy weather, good for business, Frankie. There you go.
———————————

If it is impossible to figure out the meaning of the line with just the script and you need the video of this scene, would you see the following one?

From the Movie “Verdict” (The Bar Scene)
http://www.veoh.com/watch/v141897295GmefnPXg


When I heard the bartender say, “Who are the civilians?,” I couldn’t understand why he suddenly said such a thing in this context. The word “civilian” literally means “a person not in the armed services or the police force.” Therefore, I think the line “Who are the civilians?” literally means “Who are the general citizens or the members of the public?” However, I’m not sure why he suddenly said such a thing in this context. Are there any implications or hidden meanings in the word “civilian” other than the meaning: “general citizen”?

If you would tell me what he meant by the line “Who are the civilians?,” I would be very grateful to you.

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