Question
3 Aug 2016

  • Japanese
Question about English (US)

Would you teach me how to understand colloquial expressions ?
The sentence below is quoted from 'Of Mice and Men', given by Lennie, who is not so smart.

"Ain't nobody goin' to suppose no hurt to George."
"Ain't nobody goin' to talk no hurt to George."

As for the first words, I wonder if we can rewrite them like : "Nobody is going to suppose that there is (no) hurt to George."

Also, as for the second words, like : "Nobody is going to talk (no) hurt to George."

Both the sentences mean that Lennie has a strong will not to let anyone suppose/talk hurt to George, right ?

If it's right, why is the word 'ain't' at the top of the sentence ?
I think it's a question form.

Or, my rewritten version is wrong?

Would you help me ?

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