Question
3 Jul 2018

English (US)
Closed question
Question about Japanese

さっきから気になってますけど、なぜある時は漢字が使ってるのに、他の時は使っていないのですか?動物や植物の名前がひらがなやカタカナに綴ることは以前から覚えたんですが、いまだに「分かる」や「共」がひらがなで書かれているわけがわかりません。何か言い落した漢字のルールがあるんじゃないかなと思い込んで、それがわからないということで…漢字がいっぱい使う人はだいたい頭がいいとか古臭いと思われている。(古臭いのは、古い本でいっぱい変な漢字が見ます。例えば「吾輩は猫である」は普通な言葉でも複雑な漢字を使う。それを見て、そういう漢字の使い方があるなら古いと思われる、もしくは上級。)それは日本でも漢字の習い方はシンプルから複雑へ進んでゆく。でも、そうであるならばなぜシンプルな漢字は省いているの?それは漢字の使い方の内包が関わっているのかしら?もしくはそれはその漢字がゆくゆくともう使えなくなる道をたどるとか、「なぜ」や「どうして」みたいに。しかしその言葉でも漢字があまり使えない理由は無理でもない。なぜなら、だいたいは特別な読み方があるから使ってる時は言葉が読みにくくなる。それは普通の読み方やあまり多様のない漢字でもそういう理由があるの?共は「とも」と「きょう」の読み方があるんですが、それはよく知ってて「とも」は訓読みですし…まあ、ネイティブの皆さんはどう思いますか?長くなりましたが、自分の質問が答えているように見えても、まだ皆さんの考えは聞いていただけたら嬉しいです!(難しいお話はすみません。日本語の文章を書くの、練習不足でして…)
I've been wondering about this for a while, but why is it that sometimes, kanji is used and other times it isn't? I remember learning that animal and plant names were usually spelled out in kana, but why is it that way for other words that don't even use complex kanji, like 分かる or 共? I feel like there's some unspoken rule about kanji usage and connotations I'm not quite grasping. It seems to me that people who use a lot of kanji are either taken to be brainy or archaic (I see a lot of strange kanji for ordinary words in older Japanese books like Wagahai wa Neko Dearu, which gave me the idea that that kind of kanji usage probably also indicates that something is older, or at least more advanced in other cases). I guess this is because of how kanji is learned even in Japan, starting with simpler kanji and learning more complex/obscure kanji as one gets older? But that still doesn't quite answer my question about the omission of simple kanji... But I guess that would have something to do with the connotations of kanji usage..? Or that words like that might slowly be going the way of words that almost never use kanji, like なぜ or どうして, but even in those cases it's more understandable because they generally have special readings that make the kanji usage just harder to read. Could that be why this is the case even for simpler kanji with less readings? I suppose 共 could be read とも or きょう, but even then とも seems to be the more common reading as the kunyomi... Any thoughts on this? I know I might have basically answered my own question, but I'm still curious what a native might have to say about this!

Answers
Read more comments

Japanese

Japanese

Japanese

Japanese

Japanese
Similar questions