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16 Jul 2018

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Question about English (UK)

vitiate

[vish-ee-eyt]
verb
1.

to impair or weaken the effectiveness of.
2.

to impair the quality of; make faulty; spoil

QUOTES
... some infinitesimal excess or deficiency, some minute accession of heat or cold, some chance adulteration in this or that ingredient, can vitiate a whole course of inquiry, requiring the labour of weeks to be all begun again ...
-- Charles Lever, One of Them, 1861
ORIGIN
The English verb vitiate comes directly from the Latin past participle vitiātus “spoiled, impaired,” from the verb vitiāre, which is a derivative of the noun vitium “defect, fault,” a word of uncertain etymology. Vitium is the source of Old French vice, English vice. Vitiate entered English in the 15th century.


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