Remitの例文や意味・使い方に関するQ&A

「Remit」を含む文の意味

Q: remit とはどういう意味ですか?
A: A remit can be an “area of responsibility” but it can also mean to “refer” to something.

「Remit」の使い方・例文

Q: remit を使った例文を教えて下さい。
A: "The judge has decided to remit the man's punishment because of his good behavior."

This word is not used often, and a lot of native speaker don't know it.

「Remit」の類語とその違い

Q: remit a check と send a check はどう違いますか?
A: "Your Telephone bill is now due. Please remit the amount of $30. We accept check or cash."

"The telephone bill is due; shall I pay at the shop or just send a check?".

「Remit」を翻訳

Q: remit a payment in past tense? Do you say “I remitted a payment”? I think, this sounds little weird. Could you please give me some examples. thanks は 英語 (イギリス) で何と言いますか?
A: It's too stiff.

I made a payment.

「Remit」についての他の質問

Q: 1. I'm going to remit the fine this time.
2. I'm going to waive the fine this time.
→ Do the two mean essentially the same thing? First of all, I know what "to waive" means. And I'm aware that "to remit" normally refers to sending money to someone. As far as I understand, "to remit a fine this time" means that they're required to pay for the fine, but I give them an exception this time. Eventually, both no.1 and no.2 mean they don't need to pay for it. That's why I thought both meant basically the same thing in this circumstance. Am I correct?
A: Yes they both mean the same thing however since remit is contextual someone might assume you are paying the fine if you say "I'm going to remit the fine this time". You won't hear that often since waive is a much better word because it doesn't have multiple interpretations and doesn't require as much context.
If an officer says "I'm going to remit the fine this time" it really wouldn't make sense since remit is to forgive. The officer would instead say "I'm going to remit your actions here and waive the fine" which if we changed words a bit would mean "I'm going to forgive your actions here and not give you a fine". So to sum it up:
remit is more useful in a situation in which one is giving forgiveness for an action rather than forgiveness for inaction (since the officer is not giving a punishment its inaction) and waive is the officer not doing an action (giving you the ticket) and therefore he is waiving the ticket by not acting on it.
Q: 1. I'm going to remit the fine this time.
2. I'm going to waive the fine this time.
→ Do the two mean essentially the same thing? First of all, I know what "to waive" means. And I'm aware that "to remit" normally refers to sending money to someone. As far as I understand, "to remit a fine this time" means that they're required to pay for the fine, but I give them an exception this time. Eventually, both no.1 and no.2 mean they don't need to pay for it. That's why I thought both meant basically the same thing in this circumstance. Am I correct?
A: The problem here is that remit has two almost exactly opposite meanings. To remit can mean to cancel a payment due. However, it also means to send a payment. Hence your confusion! ….and without context, mine!
Q: We would like to remit your travel expenses to account of your country. この表現は自然ですか?
A: on account of your country*

but there are better ways to say this. Can you explain the situation a bit more?

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