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Updated on
18 August

  • Japanese
  • English (US)
Question about English (US)

This trend will benefit Japanese companies in the long run since the young people can exercise their creativity. They are unlike some of their middle-*age managers who put in their time, offering no new idea unless they are sure their colleagues already agree.

Can "middle-aged manager" take the place of "middle-age manager" in this context?
Do both make sense?

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This trend will benefit Japanese companies in the long run since the young people can exercise their creativity. They are unlike some of their middle-*age managers who put in their time, offering no new idea unless they are sure their colleagues already agree.

Can "middle-aged manager" take the place of "middle-age manager" in this context?
Do both make sense?
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